The Sky Meadow Wind Phone

I’ve just returned from the first annual Sacred Harvest event at Sky Meadow, an idyllic 115-acre spiritual retreat in the mountainous Northeast Kingdom of Vermont. The Harvest was a wonderful three days of wholesome work, exploration and soul-talk, and provided me with the opportunity to fulfil my long-term ambition of creating and installing a wind … Read moreThe Sky Meadow Wind Phone

The Rogers Park Black Lives Matter Shrine, revisited

I ducked out of the annual Glenwood Avenue Arts Fair in our old Chicago neighborhood of Rogers Park today to visit the Black Lives Matter shrine, which I had started to document back in July of 2020, when it was brand new. By April, 2021 the simple shrine area had been elaborated with the addition … Read moreThe Rogers Park Black Lives Matter Shrine, revisited

Cultpunk

Readers interested in my philosophy of Poetic Faith and in the many and varied potentials of “rational, anti-authoritarian, artistic religion” could do worse than to check out Alt-death.com’s new sister site, Cultpunk.art. The site aims to serve as an intersection for Poetic Faiths of all stripes as well as to foster a more popular appreciation … Read moreCultpunk

“The Frontier Couple Who Chose Death Over Life Apart”

Click here to read Eva Holland’s excellent essay on the lives and intentional deaths of Alaskan artists Eric and Pam Bealer (note that the story is also available as a professionally-read audio-essay): Below their declaration was a passage attributed to Richard Bach, which said: “Why, instead of suffering and fighting it, don’t people reach a … Read more“The Frontier Couple Who Chose Death Over Life Apart”

Alan Moore’s “Grandeur & Monstrosity”

Any readers intrigued by the mostly inchoate phenomenon that I optimistically refer to as Poetic Faith – the notion and practice of creating one’s own religion, as a work of art – should track down Alan Moore’s story Grandeur & Monstrosity, which appears in the graphic narrative anthology “God is Dead: the Book of Acts; … Read moreAlan Moore’s “Grandeur & Monstrosity”